Wikipedia - The Human Blockhead

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Bluegrass Fair Website - Lexington, Kentucky

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The Times-Picayune

- New Orleans

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Times Daily - Florence, Alabama

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Sioux City Journal -

Sioux City, IA

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The Red & Black - Athens, Georgia

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"The sideshow is no longer a side show. It has evolved into the main act."

“It’s making the audience see something that they haven’t seen before, something they haven’t experienced, and helping them feel that instead of just viewing it,” McCormick said.

Chattanooga Now - Chattanooga, Tennessee

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“A performer made his way to center stage holding four small, shiny things. It wasn't until he held one up to the light and then slowly — gracefully even — pushed it through his skin, all the way in and back out that people realized what it was: a 10-inch, 16-gauge metal skewer. While the first one lingered above his biceps, he inserted another through the skin of his chest. Then, one pierced the stretchy, tender flesh of his cheek. The last skewer started in his mouth below his tongue, traveled through the void of his jawbone and exited under his chin. There was a little blood. Eyes widened. Mouths gaped. Some in the audience twisted away. Some hid their eyes and peeked through their fingers. Some in the audience twisted away. Some hid their eyes and peeked through their fingers. Some could not — and would not — turn away. Others stared, possibly trying to unravel the "illusion."

The Popeye Gazette - Lexington, Kentucky

“...there's much to be said about the little things, that make up the unusual people in this world; so much more than the "mundane", or the "normal" folk, the unusual people strive for the "other", the something that isn't them. And to embrace that, and go beyond to the point, I would say that Tinderbox aren't those kinds of people: they're kind, they're open, and they're honest. Nothing like the carnies of old, who were deliberately thrown out of towns and forced to travel simply because they themselves couldn't trust because no one trusted them. But they embody that antithesis in their own lives, and they play the opposite on the stage. Like one giant role play, they stand up and pull every con, every hi-jink, and every little gag they can get to shock their audience into burying their faces, and they love it. There's nothing more honest than that. Nothing more beautiful.”

Ashland, Kentucky

Ashland, Kentucky